By one get one (goat)



Most students arrive home from college with tattoos or piercings. I brought home goats or rather the idea of a micro dairy operation. Studying sustainable agriculture does things. With an organic farm on my college campus, my interest in all things goat-related was consistently fueled.


Briefly during my sophomore year I spent time working at Consider Bardwell Farm. This farm is home to one of the best raw milk creameries in the northeast. Somehow I worked my way into the position of selling cheese at the Winter Farmers Market in Dorset, Vermont, it was a dream.

I went home that summer with the idea of making my own goat milk dairy, so that one day I could have fresh goat milk cheeses at my dispose. And to do it correctly, I would need to begin from the ground up. Nigerian Dwarf goats are the perfect addition for small scale dairy options. Standing no taller than 24 inches at maturity (smaller than many dogs) they take up very little space. For such a small size these goats produce about 2 pounds of milk a day. Perfect for supplying a family their dairy grocery. Enter Margaret & Rose.

Excuse the poor quality photos- they are a few years old!

Many stories go along with this pair but my favorite is our first day together (they were 12 days old). I am named after my nana’s maiden name, Margaret Rose Keeley Frayne.  My grandmother has dementia, and at this point it had gotten quite bad. I am so grateful that this disease has kept her lovely nature — she is still the sweetest human I’ve ever known.  Moving along, on this day the house was empty except for nana. My mom, dad, and sister were out running some errand or at some horse show, I had gone to a Nigerian Dwarf Goat farm for “information” about the breed (or that’s what I told my parents). I arrived home with my two little darlings before everyone’s return. My intention was to get just one doeling (female baby goat), but with a bit of  research concluded that goats needed companionship – oh darn, guess I would have to get two. At this point my parents understood my interests in micro dairy and my long-term plan, but not the sincerity of it.

I showed the new goats to my nana and her reaction was interesting, something familiar. She seemed to know that I had done something without permission; that these goats were a little unplanned. She smiled and petted my twin girls, cooing to them telling them they are pretty girls. I brought them out to the barn to get them settled and we began bonding (bottle feeding every makes you mom real quick).  



Gravel crunched and my family was home. Smiles greeted me, but I was definitely in trouble for (1) bringing home an animal without permission and (2) getting 2 instead of my anticipated 1 doeling (oops). My grandmother had warned my mom when she came in that I had brought home two goats. In fact her words were “Did you see, she’s got goats, she’s got two of them” (!!!!!!!) This was and always will be a memorable moment. You see, my grandmother mainly speaks in broken sentences now and these sentences usually consist of how beautiful we are (I told you she was sweet), or asking for food (I can absolutely relate). Nana remembering my goats and inferring that they were not part of the plan was a fleeting moment but a great one and it only seemed fitting to name my girls Margaret and Rose.


Thank you for letting me share this story, Nana and these girls mean so much. It was inevitable that Nana would make her debut on Pitchfork and Pearls

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